There Will Be No Other Planet

A dying seabird covered in oil. A sea turtle whose body is divided into two halves because of a plastic ring she could not escape from when she was young. A seal whose neck is slowly and painfully being cut in half by a piece of a copper wire that somehow got wrapped around. A sea bay full of toxic waste and a lake filled with dead fish, and other photos that colorfully exhibit what we, humans, are doing to this planet. Our pleasures, convenience, and comfort – the cornerstones of the modern living  – do not come out of thin air, and are taking its toll on the planet. Garbage left after making us pleased does not go anywhere, either.

A dead fish floats in water filled with blue-green algae at the East Lake in Wuhan, Hubei province August 20, 2012. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

Photos are clickable.

tortoise 2
This turtle could not escape from a six-pack plastic holder that most probably came floating into the sea when she was young, and her body misshaped because of it.
stork in a plastic
This stork could not free itself from the plastic wrap that most probably got to him from the sea.
dying seabird oil - AP pHotoCharlie Reidel
Dying seabirds covered in oil in Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Gulf of Mexico in 2011. BP CEO Tony Hayward commented: the pollution is “relatively tiny” in comparison with the “very big ocean”. Of course it is. It’s not like Hayward’s own kids’ life was denied because of the spill. (c) AP photo Charlie Rieidel

dying seabird oilMore about BP oil spill: http://www.inspirationgreen.com/bp-oil-spill.html

seal neck cut
Poor seal is suffering and slowly dying because of a piece of copper wire that somehow got wrapped around his neck.
oil removal china
Man cleans up oil spill aftermath in Dalian Port, Liaoning, China. http://avaxnews.net/pictures/98855
Parola (lighthouse) Biondo side of Manila harbor is home to 20,000 squaters who live between port facilities and the mout of the Pasig River.  The river winds through downtown Manila, and carries refuse that gets deposited on the shore beneath Parola's stilt houses.   Here  Rodello Coronel Jr. 13 y.o., the second of nine children in his family, spends the morning picking through the trash on shore looking for recylable plastic, which sellls for 13 pesos (35 US cents) per kilo.   His mother can be reached at tel:09083518965.  The next day I saw him in his smart-looking school uniform with a small briefcase holding his homework papers. With a rapidly growing population, the slums of Manila have extended onto coastal mudflats and waterways that are very susceptible to flooding from storms and rising sea levels.  The government is trying to move these people out of the hazard areas, but have agreed that that they must be moved to new areas nearby from which they can reasonably commute to work (less than 25km).  For more info contact Dennis Murphy of the Philippine NGO Urban Poor Associates Urban Poor Associates
Photographer George Steinmetz: “Parola (lighthouse) Biondo side of Manila harbor is home to 20,000 squatters who live between port facilities and the mouth of the Pasig River. The river winds through downtown Manila, and carries refuse that gets deposited on the shore beneath Parola’s stilt houses. Here Rodello Coronel Jr. 13 y.o., the second of nine children in his family, spends the morning picking through the trash on shore looking for recyclable plastic, which he sells for 13 pesos (35 US cents) per kilo. His mother can be reached at tel: 09083518965. The next day I saw him in his smart-looking school uniform with a small briefcase holding his homework papers. With a rapidly growing population, the slums of Manila have extended onto coastal mudflats and waterways that are very susceptible to flooding from storms and rising sea levels. The government is trying to move these people out of the hazard areas, but have agreed that that they must be moved to new areas nearby from which they can reasonably commute to work (less than 25km). For more info contact Dennis Murphy of the Philippine NGO Urban Poor Associates.”
fake view of hong kong for tourists
Fake view of Hong Kong for tourists. Photo: Molly Smith http://www.boredpanda.com/author/morningclaire/
dead bird plastic
Albatross killed by excessive plastic ingestion in Midway Islands (North Pacific)
dead fish removal
Man cleans away dead fish at a lake in Wuhan, Central China’s Hubei Province
child in dirty waters
A child swims in a polluted reservoir in Pingba, southwest China’s Guizhou province. http://avaxnews.net/pictures/98857

There are 7,37 billion of our species in the world today, and every one of us unwittingly contributes to the process of slow destruction of the planet.

There are solutions, though, and the only path that leads to these solutions is environmental awareness, compassion, and knowledge.

Population Speakout project’s primary concern is human overpopulation and the problems caused by that. In developed countries, each person generates daily 4.3lb (1.95kg) of waste (compare with 2.7 lb (1.2kg) in 1960). According to the highest estimates bu US Census Bureau, the world’s population will rise to 16 billion by 2100 (http://www.census.gov/population/international/). There is going to a lot of waste, I’m telling you.

That is why we, the people of today, have to plan families wisely, think rationally, spend reasonably, and most of all, live sensibly, with consideration to environment.

Because there will be no other planet.
See more at http://www.boredpanda.com/environmental-pollution/
Population speakout project https://populationspeakout.org/

#environmentalsustainability #ecology #conservation #waterpollution #humanimpact

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s