Bees Are In Sharp Decline Worldwide

Sharp decline in number of bumblebees, which are one of the world’s most important pollinators, driven primarily by habitat loss, declines in floral abundance and use of poisonous chemicals in agriculture, is causing a great concern worldwide.
Read more on this on IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species’‚Äč website:
http://support.iucnredlist.org/updates/life-and-death-humble-bumblebee

In Ontario province, honeybees are in sharp decline. Who, or what, is killing them? Read about it in the following article by TVO’s Tim Alamenciak:
http://tvo.org/article/current-affairs/the-food-chain/whats-killing-ontarios-bees

But if you think that this is a completely new phenomenon, you are mistaken. Read about decline in bumblebee species in the past 60 years in an academic paper called “Decline and conservation of bumble bees” by Goulson D, Lye GC, Darvill B.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17803456

bee
Image: publicdomainpictures.net

There Will Be No Other Planet

A dying seabird covered in oil. A sea turtle whose body is divided into two halves because of a plastic ring she could not escape from when she was young. A seal whose neck is slowly and painfully being cut in half by a piece of a copper wire that somehow got wrapped around. A sea bay full of toxic waste and a lake filled with dead fish, and other photos that colorfully exhibit what we, humans, are doing to this planet. Our pleasures, convenience, and comfort Рthe cornerstones of the modern living  Рdo not come out of thin air, and are taking its toll on the planet. Garbage left after making us pleased does not go anywhere, either.

A dead fish floats in water filled with blue-green algae at the East Lake in Wuhan, Hubei province August 20, 2012. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

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